The Little Review (littlereview) wrote,
The Little Review
littlereview

Poem for Thursday and The Day the Earth Stood Still


Monsoon Poem
By Tishani Doshi

Because this is a monsoon poem
expect to find the words jasmine,
palmyra, Kuruntokai, red; mangoes
in reference to trees or breasts; paddy
fields, peacocks, Kurinji flowers,
flutes; lotus buds guarding love’s
furtive routes. Expect to hear a lot
about erotic consummation inferred
by laburnum gyrations and bamboo
syncopations. Listen to the racket
of wide-mouthed frogs and bent-
legged prawns going about their
business of mating while rain falls
and falls on tiled roofs and verandas,
courtyards, pagodas. Because such
a big part of you seeks to understand
this kind of rain — so unlike your cold
rain, austere rain, get-me-the-hell-
out-of-here rain. Rain that can’t fathom
how to liberate camphor from the vaults
of the earth. Let me tell you how little
is written of mud, how it sneaks up
like a sleek-gilled vandal to catch hold
of your ankles. Or about the restorative
properties of mosquito blood, dappled
and fried against the wires of a bug-zapping
paddle. So much of monsoon is to do
with being overcome — not from longing
as you might think, but from the sky’s
steady bludgeoning, until every leaf
on every unremembered tree gleams
in the abyss of postcoital bliss.
Come. Now sip on your masala tea,
put your lips to the sweet, spicy skin
of it. There’s more to see — notice
the dogs who’ve been fucking on the beach,
locked in embrace like an elongated Anubis,
the crabs scavenging the flesh of a dopey-
eyed ponyfish, the entire delirious coast
with its philtra of beach and saturnine
clouds arched backwards in disbelief.
And the mayflies who swarm in November
with all their ephemeral grandeur to die
in millions at the behest of light, the geckos
stationed on living room walls, cramming
fistfuls of wings in their maws. Notice
how hardly anyone mentions the word
death, even though the fridge leaks
and the sheets have been damp for weeks.
And in this helter-skelter multitude
of gray-greenness, notice how even the rain
begins to feel fatigued. The roads and sewers
have nowhere to go, and like old-fashioned pursuers
they wander and spill their babbling hearts
to electrical poles and creatures with ears.
And what happens later, you might ask,
after we’ve moved to a place of shelter,
when the cracks in the earth have reappeared?
We dream of wet, of course, of being submerged
in millet stalks, of webbed toes and stalled
clocks and eels in the mouth of a heron.
We forget how unforgivably those old poems
led us to believe that men were mountains,
that the beautiful could never remain
heartbroken, that when the rains arrive
we should be delighted to be taken
in drowning, in devotion.

--------

Running late because I got to talk to both of my kids in Seattle this evening -- Adam to catch us up on his birthday weekend, at which he visited a lavender festival but accidentally shipped his lavender tea to us so I get to enjoy some of it, and Daniel because we haven't really talked to him since we were there and he's been juggling a bunch of projects. It was otherwise an uneventful Wednesday whose most notable activity was a failed trip to Home Depot, since apparently our house's outlet covers are so old that no one makes the right size any more.

We've had so much rain here that it feels like Seattle, though they get it in the winter and we've had a July with many, many flood warnings, including today. We half-watched the first episode of Burden of Truth, which was okay, and turned off Planet Earth when foxes were about to eat mountain goats. Speaking of Seattle, here are my kids at the Museum of Popular Culture -- formerly the EMP Museum, and before that, the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame -- with the robot from The Day the Earth Stood Still, in photos taken in 2005 and a couple of weeks ago:

DSCN8053

DSCN3554
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