June 27th, 2004

little review

Poem For Sunday

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And gacked from xochiquetzl, whom it turns out I know from the Ghost of Fandom Past...this is really not true but of the choices it's as good as any. Voyeurism is SO my kink! Collapse )

Today we are going to the Folklife Festival at the Smithsonian, and hopefully into the National Gallery of Art to see the Hudson River School exhibit. It is absolutely gorgeous out and both my horoscope and my tarot card reading for the day say things like, "You can't go wrong by expressing your needs and how they fit in with the collective agenda. Feel free to focus on yourself today and be selfish about your passions."

Hope everyone else has a lovely Sunday! And, Marylanders, we must all be home at 9 p.m. tonight, because Snakehead Terror is on the Sci-Fi Channel. "Mutant, amphibious snakehead fish feast on humans as they close in on a Maryland village where the only obstacle is the local sheriff (Bruce Boxleitner)." I figured he was hard up for work after Babylon 5 went off the air but I had no idea things had gotten this bad. Carol Alt's his co-star. Whee!
little review

Folklife

What a perfectly gorgeous day for being at the Folklife Festival -- last year we had to miss it, as we were out of town, and the year before when it was a hundred degrees with smoke from Quebec forest fires blowing over the region, I wound up in the hospital with a migraine (I'd never had a full-blown one before, didn't realize that dizziness, throwing up and the belief that violent death could not be more painful than such a headache were all normal symptoms). Today it was in the low 80s and breezy, not too mobbed to get drinks whenever we felt like it, and my father decided to come with us after dropping my mother off at the airport to visit my sister so we took a leisurely pace through.

In addition to exhibits on Haiti and on Latino music (which could be heard all across the National Mall), one of the themes of this year's festival is Water Ways: Mid-Atlantic Maritime Communities. There was a Chesapeake Bay skipjack -- an oyster boat -- on display along with boat-building tents where people were actually building little rowboats and sailboats, exhibits on commercial fishing and crab traps (Phillips Seafood was there, selling crab cakes and making the entire Mall smell like a fried seafood restaurant which is all to the good as far as I'm concerned), artists carving decoys, water safety and rescue information, and many models of ships. We wandered through those tents, then briefly through the Haitian cooking exhibits.

Then we walked through the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden into the museum to see a collection of landscape paintings by Sanford Gifford, one of the Hudson River School artists; we used to go to the Wadsworth Atheneum and the New Britain Museum of American Art when my in-laws lived in Hartford, where the influence of Church, Cole and Bierstadt is much in evidence, and where I discovered Gifford. Autumn was apparently his favorite season, and sunset his favorite time of day, and he loved mountains and shores, so the paintings are suffused with red and violet light and there's a great deal of greenery and waterside scenery -- as with most of the Hudson River School artists, with the people and animals greatly diminished by the landscapes. He lost a brother in the Civil War, which is a big theme in his work, and you can see where Thomas Kinkade swiped some of his mountain lake imagery and use of light.

I'll take a break from nature photography for some pictures from downtown...


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We came home for dinner as the boys start camp tomorrow and wanted time to chill out. I had to fold laundry and put on Jesus Christ Superstar while they were playing down the basement; to my surprise they both came up to watch, having heard the music, and we ended up talking them through the Gospels while watching. I should perhaps add that, being Jewish, some of my earliest exposures to the Gospels were via JCS and Godspell, long before I actually read the New Testament, so my Jesus has always been a hippie Jesus who fights corrupt authority, preaches love and doesn't put up with infighting among his followers regarding things they don't approve of concerning one another's lifestyles. How come the Fundamentalists have never heard of that Jesus? I can see him in the Gospels just fine.