The Little Review (littlereview) wrote,
The Little Review
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Poem for Thursday


My Last Duchess
By Robert Browning


That's my last Duchess painted on the wall,
Looking as if she were alive. I call
That piece a wonder, now: Frà Pandolf's hands
Worked busily a day, and there she stands.
Will 't please you sit and look at her? I said
'Frà Pandolf' by design, for never read
Strangers like you that pictured countenance,
The depth and passion of its earnest glance,
But to myself they turned (since none puts by
The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)
And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,
How such a glance came there; so, not the first
Are you to turn and ask thus. Sir, 't was not
Her husband's presence only, called that spot
Of joy into the Duchess' cheek: perhaps
Frà Pandolf chanced to say, 'Her mantle laps
Over my lady's wrist too much,' or 'Paint
Must never hope to reproduce the faint
Half-flush that dies along her throat:' such stuff
Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough
For calling up that spot of joy. She had
A heart -- how shall I say? -- too soon made glad,
Too easily impressed; she liked whate'er
She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.
Sir, 't was all one! My favour at her breast,
The dropping of the daylight in the West,
The bough of cherries some officious fool
Broke in the orchard for her, the white mule
She rode with round the terrace -- all and each
Would draw from her alike the approving speech,
Or blush, at least. She thanked men, -- good! but thanked
Somehow -- I know not how -- as if she ranked
My gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name
With anybody's gift. Who'd stoop to blame
This sort of trifling? Even had you skill
In speech -- (which I have not) -- to make your will
Quite clear to such an one, and say, 'Just this
Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,
Or there exceed the mark' -- and if she let
Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set
Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse,
-- E'en then would be some stooping; and I choose
Never to stoop. Oh, sir, she smiled, no doubt,
Whene'er I passed her; but who passed without
Much the same smile? This grew; I have commands;
Then all smiles stopped together. There she stands
As if alive. Will 't please you rise? We'll meet
The company below then. I repeat,
The Count your master's known munificence
Is ample warrant that no just pretence
Of mine for dowry will be disallowed;
Though his fair daughter's self, as I avowed
At starting, is my object. Nay, we'll go
Together down, sir. Notice Neptune, though,
Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity,
Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!

--------

I have novels sitting here by my two favorite living novelists, Richard Zimler and Janette Turner Hospital. *happy dance* Which should I read first, Zimler's Hunting Midnight (Marrano Jews, necromancers, the slave trade and Napoleon's armies in Portugal) or Hospital's Due Preparations for the Plague (terrorism, cults, knowledge as power and heroism that outlasts death)?

Yesterday I had lunch with my mother, and today, with luck, I am having lunch with perkypaduan. No wonder I am not losing any weight. This afternoon I have to submit to my dermatologist's scalpel to make sure they got all the abnormal tissue last time around. At least I only have to write one article today (CSI calendars -- does this mean that the Pre-Raphaelite calendars will be out soon?)

This morning I got 36, count 'em, 36 spam messages about Viagra. Cheap, discreet, will make women scream for me. Last weekend while watching Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, I was startled to learn that the image below is actually a place on Vulcan, minus the greenery...


Vasquez Rocks, California
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